People who ate at The Mustard Seed Restaurant (31 E Main Street Fredonia, NY) between April 1 and May 19, 2021 were potentially exposed to hepatitis A. Most people do not get sick when an employee at a restaurant has hepatitis A, but there is still  a risk. People who may have been exposed should receive treatment to prevent infection.

“While the risk of hepatitis A infection is low, we must act prudently to prevent the spread of this very contagious disease,” said Christine Schuyler, County Public Health Director.  “Anyone who may have eaten at this restaurant during this timeframe should check their immunization status and if not already vaccinated against hepatitis A, come to our free clinic this Saturday or visit their healthcare provider if they are experiencing symptoms.”

As a result of this potential hepatitis A exposure, the Chautauqua County Health Department is advising anyone who ate  food at or consumed takeout food from the restaurant between May 8 and May 19 to receive a free hepatitis A vaccine tomorrow, May 22 at a clinic planned by the department. The clinic will be held at SUNY Fredonia’s Steele Hall (280 Central Ave Fredonia, NY 14063) from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM.

The hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin is only effective within two weeks of exposure to the virus. People who ate at The Mustard Seed Restaurant between May 8 and May 19 (and have not been previously vaccinated against hepatitis A) should receive the hepatitis A vaccine or immune globulin  as soon as possible. Walk-ins and pre-registration for the clinic are both acceptable. Visit chqgov.com or http://bit.ly/hepa52121 to pre- register. Please bring your driver’s license or another form of identification.

Those who ate at The Mustard Seed Restaurant between April 1 and May 7 may have been exposed, but the hepatitis A vaccine given this weekend will not prevent infection from this exposure. These persons are encouraged to monitor themselves and their families for symptoms for 50 days after consuming the food. Symptoms may include: fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark-colored urine, clay-colored stools, joint pain, or jaundice. If you have any symptoms, contact your healthcare provider and be sure to tell them  that you may have been exposed to hepatitis A.

Clinics are for those who ate at the Mustard Seed Restaurant in Fredonia between May 8, 2021 and May 18, 2021.  Or got take out or catered frood from the restaurant in that same time frame.  Please be prepared to tell us the date and time that you ate food from the restaurant as well as what you ate or drank. Provide receipts from your purchase if at all possible.

  • Tuesday, May 25th 4:30pm-6:30pm at
    Cassadaga Valley School Bus Garage
    5935 Route 60
    Sinclairville, NY 14782
    Clinic Sign Up  
  • Friday, May 28th 3:00pm-7:00pm at
    SUNY Fredonia Steele Hall
    280 Central Avenue
    Track and field facility
    Fredonia, NY 14063
    Clinic Sign Up 

Viral hepatitis is a major global public health problem affecting hundreds of millions of people and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Five biologically unrelated hepatotropic viruses cause most of the global burden of viral hepatitis: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV), hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), and hepatitis E virus (HEV).  

Hepatitis A is a communicable (or contagious) disease that is acquired primarily by the fecal oral route either from person to person or through contaminated food or water. Food-related outbreaks are most commonly associated with contamination of food during preparation by an HAV-infected food handler. The food handler may not recognize they are contagious or ill because the peak time of infectivity—that is, when the most virus is present in the stool of an infected individual—occurs during the two weeks before symptoms begin. The clinical manifestations and duration of illness vary a great deal, with many persons, especially young children, showing no symptoms at all. The clinical signs of HAV infection include dark urine and, sometimes, clay-colored stool, often accompanied or followed by jaundice. Associated symptoms may involve fever, abdominal pain, loss of appetite, diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, headache, and extreme fatigue. Hepatitis A is the only common vaccine-preventable foodborne disease in the United States. Each year, approximately 3,700 to 10,000 cases of hepatitis A occur in the United States.

The Oneida County Health Department has learned that an employee of Roma Sausage and Deli has tested positive for Hepatitis A. The employee worked while infectious and may have exposed people who were customers of the shop.

The Health Department is alerting those who consumed tomato pie from either of Roma Sausage and Deli’s locations at Washington Mills or Utica of the potential exposure.

The Hepatitis vaccine is available if given within two weeks of exposure. For those who consumed tomato pie prepared by the shop on March 27, 28, 30, or 31, you must receive preventive treatment within 14 days of exposure.

If exposed on: Need vaccination by:
March 27 April 10
March 28 April 11
March 30 April 13
March 31 April 14

Oneida County Health Department is setting up Hepatitis A vaccination clinics for April 10-13. Please visit www.ocgov.net to schedule an appointment or contact your healthcare provider to be given the vaccination.

Those who consumed tomato pie from Roma’s during the period of March 23-26, are past the window to receive the vaccine, but should monitor themselves for symptoms. According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, symptoms of Hepatitis A include:

·         Yellow skin or eyes
·         Lack of appetite
·         Upset stomach
·         Stomach pain
·         Vomiting
·         Fever
·         Dark urine or light colored stools
·         Joint pain
·         Diarrhea
·         Fatigue

Symptoms commonly appear within 28 days of exposure, with a range of 15 to 50 days.  Hepatitis A is transmitted by consuming food or drinks or by using utensils that have been handled by an infected person. It may also be spread from person to person by ingesting something that has been contaminated by the infected person. Casual contact, such as sitting together, does not spread the virus. If you have any of these symptoms, please contact the Oneida County Health Department or your health care provider.

Roma Sausage and Deli has been notified of potential Hepatitis A exposure and is cooperating with OCHD. Follow-up inspections will occur.

If you have had the COVID-19 vaccine within the past two weeks you can get the Hepatitis A vaccine.  If you are scheduled to have a COVID-19 vaccine within two weeks of the Hepatitis A vaccine, your COVID-19 vaccination should be rescheduled to two weeks after the Hepatitis A vaccination.

“All those who are eligible to get vaccinated for Hepatitis A should,” said Daniel W. Gilmore, Ph.D. MPH, Director of Health. “In addition, continue good hygiene practices, especially handwashing.”

The Mississippi State Department of Health (MSDH) is investigating two cases of hepatitis A in Jackson County restaurant employees which may have led to possible exposure for customers.

Two employees of Brady’s Steaks and Seafood, 3801 Magnolia St. in Pascagoula have been diagnosed with hepatitis A infection, and worked at the restaurant while potentially infectious. Customers who ate at the restaurant between March 1 and April 3, 2021, may have been exposed to hepatitis A. At this time, there is no indication of an ongoing risk associated with the restaurant.

All individuals who ate at the restaurant between March 1 and April 3 should watch for any possible symptoms of hepatitis A and see their doctor if they become ill. Individuals who ate at the restaurant within the last two weeks should get a hepatitis A vaccination if not previously vaccinated. Vaccination can prevent hepatitis A only if given within 14 days of exposure.

Those who may have eaten at the restaurant within the last two weeks can receive a hepatitis A vaccination free of charge from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Thursday, April 8th at the Jackson County Health Department, 46000 Lt. Eugene J. Majure Drive, in Pascagoula.

“The risk of transmission of hepatitis A in this situation is likely very low. However, as a precaution, we recommend that anyone who ate food from this restaurant within the last two weeks should consider getting a hepatitis A vaccination if they have not done so already. All individuals who may have been exposed between March 1 and April 3 should watch for any possible symptoms of hepatitis A and see their doctor if they become ill,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Paul Byers.

“The management and staff of Brady’s are fully cooperating with MSDH to prevent illnesses as a result of this exposure,” said Byers.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that causes fever, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes), abdominal pain and dark colored urine. Hepatitis A usually spreads when a person unknowingly ingests the virus from objects, food or drinks contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool (feces) from an infected person. If you think you have symptoms of hepatitis A, you should contact your healthcare provider.

Everyone can prevent the spread of hepatitis A by carefully washing hands with soap and water, including under the fingernails, after using the bathroom or changing diapers, and before preparing or eating food.

“The risk of transmission of hepatitis A in this situation is likely very low. However, as a precaution, we recommend that anyone who ate food from this restaurant within the last two weeks should consider getting a hepatitis A vaccination if they have not done so already. All individuals who may have been exposed between March 1 and April 3 should watch for any possible symptoms of hepatitis A and see their doctor if they become ill,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Paul Byers.

“The management and staff of Brady’s are fully cooperating with MSDH to prevent illnesses as a result of this exposure,” said Byers.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that causes fever, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes), abdominal pain and dark colored urine. Hepatitis A usually spreads when a person unknowingly ingests the virus from objects, food or drinks contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool (feces) from an infected person.

If you think you have symptoms of hepatitis A, you should contact your healthcare provider.

Everyone can prevent the spread of hepatitis A by carefully washing hands with soap and water, including under the fingernails, after using the bathroom or changing diapers, and before preparing or eating food.

“The risk of transmission of hepatitis A in this situation is likely very low. However, as a precaution, we recommend that anyone who ate food from this restaurant within the last two weeks should consider getting a hepatitis A vaccination if they have not done so already. All individuals who may have been exposed between March 1 and April 3 should watch for any possible symptoms of hepatitis A and see their doctor if they become ill,” said State Epidemiologist Dr. Paul Byers.

“The management and staff of Brady’s are fully cooperating with MSDH to prevent illnesses as a result of this exposure,” said Byers.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease that causes fever, nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes), abdominal pain and dark colored urine. Hepatitis A usually spreads when a person unknowingly ingests the virus from objects, food or drinks contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool (feces) from an infected person. If you think you have symptoms of hepatitis A, you should contact your healthcare provider.

Everyone can prevent the spread of hepatitis A by carefully washing hands with soap and water, including under the fingernails, after using the bathroom or changing diapers, and before preparing or eating food.

The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC) has identified a case of acute hepatitis A virus infection in an Orono, Maine, food service worker. The individual handled food while infectious on the following dates: March 6-9, March 13-16, and March 20-21, 2021.

Epidemiological assessment of the employee’s illness determined that patrons of the establishment may be at risk for hepatitis A infection. Maine CDC recommends that anyone who ate food prepared at or who worked at the Circle K at 2 Stillwater Avenue in Orono, Maine, from March 13 through 16 and March 20 through 21 receive hepatitis A vaccine within 14 days of their potential exposure. There is a 14-day window during which prophylaxis is effective after exposure.

Anyone who ate food prepared at or who worked at this establishment from March 6 through 9, 2021, is outside the window for which prophylaxis is recommended. Such individuals are advised to watch for symptoms and seek medical attention should they develop symptoms (see below). Health care providers are encouraged to remain vigilant for hepatitis A infection in persons with consistent symptoms and should ask individuals with such symptoms about consumption of food from or working at this establishment during this period.

Food Service Workers should get a damn Vaccine.

Chemung County is alerting the public to a potential exposure of a confirmed case of the Hepatitis A virus.

The Chemung County Health Department launched a disease investigation of a Schuyler County resident who worked at two area Dunkin Donuts while infected.

Now, the county is setting up a free clinic for community members, urging those who may have had any contact with the infected individual to get a vaccine to protect against Hepatitis A. Those details can be found below.

Hepatitis A is a highly contagious liver infection caused by the Hepatitis A virus. More in-depth details about the virus can be found below.

Officials say, following laboratory testing, interviews and a restaurant inspection, an employee who handles food at Dunkin Donuts on Corning Road (Miracle Mile) in Elmira Heights was identified with the Hepatitis A virus.

The worker also worked one day at the Dunkin Donuts in the Walmart store on County Road 64 in Horseheads.

The Dunkin locations have been notified of the potential exposure and the employee has not worked since February 11th.

Additionally, the Health Department has advised the manager to send any staff reporting Hepatitis A virus related symptoms for medical evaluation before returning to work.

Employees of the restaurant will be offered post exposure prophylaxis (PEP), which is medicine to prevent Hepatitis A after a possible exposure.

Dunkin Donuts in Elmira Heights will be subject to additional inspections over the coming weeks and is complying with NYSDOH recommendations.

As a result of this potential Hepatitis A virus exposure, the Chemung County Health Department is advising anyone who ate food or drinks via dine-in, takeout, delivery or utilized the restroom at Dunkin Donuts in Elmira Heights (2501 Corning Rd., Elmira Heights, NY 14903) on February 9 or February 11, 2021 to receive free Hepatitis A vaccine from the Chemung County Health Department to prevent potentially exposed individuals from becoming infected.

Masks are required at the clinic. The vaccination clinic will be held at:

Where: Mass Vaccination Clinic, 17 Aviation Dr., Horseheads, NY 14845

When: Saturday February 20th from 9 am to Noon and Sunday, February 21st Noon to 3 pm

Those attending the Clinic are encouraged to pre-register to save time during the onsite registration process. Pre-registration may be completed prior to arrival by visiting, www.chemungcountyny.gov/HepA and look for the pre-registration links.

“We encourage those who may have been exposed during these specific timeframes to visit the clinic to receive free post exposure prophylaxis,” stated Public Health Director Peter Buzzetti.

Those who ate food or drinks via dine-in, takeout, delivery or utilized the restroom at either Dunkin Donuts locations between January 26, 2021 and February 5, 2021 may have been exposed but will not benefit from Hepatitis A vaccine to prevent infection from this exposure and are encouraged to monitor themselves and their families for symptoms for 50 days after consuming the food.

Those who develop symptoms suggestive of Hepatitis A virus should seek medical evaluation.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A virus can include:

  • Fever
  • Fatigue
  • Loss of appetite
  •  Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Abdominal pain
  • Dark urine
  • Clay-colored stools
  • Joint pain
  • Jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes)

The disease is rarely fatal and most people recover in a few weeks without any complications. Adults have signs and symptoms of illness more often than children.

Infants and young children tend to have very mild symptoms and are less likely to develop jaundice than are older children and adults. Not everyone who is infected will have all of the symptoms.

Hepatitis A is a highly contagious liver infection caused by the Hepatitis A virus. It can range from no symptoms at all, to a mild illness lasting a few weeks, to a severe illness lasting several months. Although rare, Hepatitis A can cause death in some people.

Hepatitis A usually spreads when a person unknowingly ingests the virus from objects, food, or drinks contaminated by small, undetected amounts of stool from an infected person. This can happen from eating at a restaurant, sharing food or drink, or eating when traveling in one of the many countries outside the United States with a high Hepatitis A infection rate.

Those with a past infection from Hepatitis A cannot be re-infected. He or she is immune for life and does not continue to carry the virus.

People who are most at risk of Hepatitis A include:

  • People with direct contact with someone who has a Hepatitis A infection. This can occur up to 2 weeks before the infected person develops symptoms, so you may not be aware of your exposure at the time.
  • Travelers to countries where Hepatitis A is common, which include most countries outside the United States. More information is available on the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s web site: https://wwwnc.cdc.gov/travel/diseases/hepatitis-a
  • Men who have sexual contact with men,
  • People who use drugs, both injection and non-injection drugs, and
  • Homeless individuals

For more information about Hepatitis A, visit: https://www.health.ny.gov/diseases/communicable/hepatitis/hepatitis_a/food_service_workers_fact_sheet.htm

People who ate at the Trading Post Restaurant on October 18th, October 20th, October 23rd, October 25th or October 28th, were potentially exposed to hepatitis A.  Most people do not get sick when an employee at a restaurant has hepatitis A, but there is still a risk.

As a result of this risk, those who might have been exposed should monitor themselves for signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A over the next 50 days.   Signs and symptoms of Hepatitis A include: fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark colored urine, clay-colored stools, joint pain, or jaundice.  If you develop symptoms, contact your health care provider and be sure to tell them that you may have been exposed to Hepatitis A.

If anyone ate at the restaurant on days other than those listed above, there was no exposure.  The restaurant remains open and under no restrictions.  The owner and staff at the restaurant have been very cooperative with our investigation and there is currently no ongoing concern or risk to patrons.

The Maine CDC says customers of a Moosehead Lake restaurant could be at risk of contracting hepatitis A.

Health officials say a worker at The Birches Resort in Rockwood, who was ill with hepatitis A, handled food while infectious between Sept. 2 and 22.

According to the Maine CDC, an assessment of the employee’s illness determined that restaurant patrons may be at risk for hepatitis A infection.

The Maine CDC recommends that anyone who may have eaten food prepared at The Birches Resort Restaurant or worked at the restaurant from Sept. 16 through Sept. 22 receive hepatitis A vaccine within 14 days of their potential exposure. There is a 14-day window during which prophylaxis is effective after exposure.

Anyone who may have had dine-in, take-out, delivery, or curbside pickup of food from the restaurant should ask a medical provider about receiving the vaccine.

People who visited the restaurant from Sept. 2 through Sept. 15 are outside the window for which prophylaxis is recommended but are advised to watch for symptoms and seek medical attention should symptoms develop, according to the Maine CDC.

Individuals with compromised immune systems or children younger than one year old who visited the restaurant during this time may benefit from hepatitis A immune globulin (IG), upon consultation with their health care providers.

The Maine CDC says the best way to prevent hepatitis A infection is to get vaccinated.

Hepatitis A is a contagious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus. Symptoms range from mild illness to a severe sickness that requires hospitalization and can last several months.

Most adults with hepatitis A have a sudden onset of symptoms such as tiredness, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea, dark urine, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). Most children younger than 6 years old do not have symptoms or have an unrecognized infection.

Hepatitis A can be spread through contaminated food or water, especially in food prepared by a person who is infected. Symptoms begin to show 15-50 days after exposure to the virus. An infected person can spread the virus to others approximately two weeks before symptoms start until one week after symptoms end.

The Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC) has identified a case of acute hepatitis A virus infection in a Saco food service worker.

The individual handled food at Saco House of Pizza in Saco while infectious from August 5, 2020, through August 21, 2020. While this employee was not in charge of preparing food, the individual had access to food in the kitchen.

Maine CDC’s assessment of the employee’s illness determined that restaurant patrons and employees may be at risk for hepatitis A infection. Out of an abundance of caution, Maine CDC recommends that anyone who may have eaten food prepared at Saco House of Pizza or worked at the restaurant from August 18, 2020, through August 21, 2020, promptly receive hepatitis A vaccine, as there is a 14-day window during which prophylaxis is effective after exposure. This includes anyone who may have had take-out, delivery, or curbside pickup of food from the restaurant.

Anyone who visited the restaurant from August 5, 2020, through August 17, 2020, is outside the timeframe for which prophylaxis is recommended but should watch for symptoms and seek medical attention if symptoms develop. Individuals with compromised immune systems or children younger than one year old who visited the restaurant during this time may benefit from hepatitis A immune globulin (IG), upon consultation with their health care providers.

The best way to prevent hepatitis A infection is to get vaccinated.

Hepatitis A is a vaccine-preventable, contagious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus. Symptoms range from mild illness to a severe sickness that requires hospitalization and can last several months. Most adults with hepatitis A have a sudden onset of symptoms such as tiredness, low appetite, stomach pain, nausea, dark urine, and jaundice (yellowing of the skin and eyes). Most children younger than 6 years old do not have symptoms or have an unrecognized infection.

Hepatitis A can be spread through contaminated food or water, especially in food prepared by a person who is infected. Symptoms begin to show 15-50 days after exposure to the virus. An infected person can spread the virus to others from approximately two weeks before symptoms start until one week after symptoms end.

Health care providers are encouraged to remain vigilant for hepatitis A infection in persons with consistent symptoms.

According to press reports, there has been a sharp increase in hepatitis A cases in three Maine counties since February, according to a release sent out by the Maine Center for Disease Control and Prevention (Maine CDC) Friday morning.

It says there were zero cases reported in the counties between January and February of this year, but in the last four months, there has since been an uptick to 26 cases total.

According to the release, in 21 of the 26 cases, there were risk factors of injection drug use or housing insecurity.

Maine has had seven to ten cases of hepatitis A cases per year during the past decade, but last year that number more than tripled to 45 cases total.

“This increase was driven by a restaurant-associated outbreak and cases related to injection drug use or housing insecurity,” the release reads. “Since January 1, 2020, Maine CDC has identified 39 cases of Hepatitis A statewide — recent case investigations, however, have not identified a source of the infections.”

New Hampshire, Vermont, and Massachusetts are also among states that have reported outbreaks of hepatitis A.

Hepatitis A infection is a liver infection caused by the hepatitis A virus and is usually spread through personal contact rather than contaminated food or water. Symptoms include fever, fatigue, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, dark urine, clay-colored bowel movements, joint pain, and jaundice – according to the release.