Header graphic for print

Hepatitis Blog

Surveillance & Analysis on Hepatitis News & Outbreaks

Hepatitis A Vaccines Reccomended After Hilton Head Exposure

The Hilton Head Island Packet reports that nearly 300 people might have been exposed to hepatitis A at Hudson’s Seafood House on the Docks restaurant February 15th, but so far no cases stemming from the exposure have been confirmed.  An employee at Hudson’s Seafood House on the Docks tested positive for hepatitis A on last Friday, six days after the employee had worked at the restaurant.

Anyone who was at the restaurant from 4 p.m. until closing time February 15th — when the infected employee was working — should contact his or her primary care provider to receive a single-dose vaccine no later than March 1.  The treatment must be administered within 14 days of possible exposure because people usually become sick within 15 to 50 days after being exposed. Symptoms include fatigue, fever, loss of appetite, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain, and those infected may also experience joint pain and jaundice.  Most patients recover completely within two months, but symptoms can persist for up to six months in severe cases.  Acute liver failure is a risk.

If hepatitis A vaccines are not available at a primary care provider, customers should call DHEC at 800-868-0404 to schedule an appointment at a local health department.  DHEC clinics in Beaufort County will provide hepatitis A vaccines by appointment this week; vaccines cost $52.30 for people who have health insurance, $25 for those without insurance and $13 for children.

Hudson’s Seafood House Employee with Hepatitis A

According to the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (DHEC), customers and staff of Hudson’s Seafood House on the Docks in Hilton Head Island who were present at the restaurant on the evening of February 15, 2014, are encouraged to contact their primary care provider to receive treatment for possible exposure to the Hepatitis A virus.  On Friday, DHEC was notified that an employee who worked at the restaurant on the evening of February 15 has tested positive for Hepatitis A. The employee is being treated for the infection and has not returned to work.

Exposure to the hepatitis A virus can cause an acute infection of the liver that is typically mild and resolves on its own. The symptoms and duration of illness vary a great deal, with many persons showing no symptoms at all.  Fever and jaundice are two of the symptoms most commonly associated with a hepatitis A infection. Symptoms typically begin about 28 days after contracting hepatitis A, but can begin as early as 15 days or as late as 50 days after exposure. The symptoms include muscle aches, headache, anorexia (loss of appetite), abdominal discomfort, fever, and malaise.  Liver failure and death are rare, but can occur.

Hepatitis A:  Marler Clark, The Food Safety Law Firm, is the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of Hepatitis A outbreaks. The Hepatitis A lawyers of Marler Clark have represented thousands of victims of Hepatitis A and other foodborne illness outbreaks and have recovered over $600 million for clients.  Marler Clark is the only law firm in the nation with a practice focused exclusively on foodborne illness litigation.  Our Hepatitis A lawyers have litigated Hepatitis A cases stemming from outbreaks traced to a variety of sources, such as green onions, lettuce and restaurant food.  The law firm has brought Hepatitis A lawsuits against such companies as Subway, McDonald’s, Chipotle, Quiznos and Carl’s Jr.

If you or a family member became ill with a Hepatitis A infection after consuming food and you’re interested in pursuing a legal claim, contact the Marler Clark Hepatitis A attorneys for a free case evaluation.

Going to Olympics? Get Hepatitis A Vaccine

Before attending the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, U.S. health officials recommend travelers ensure their vaccinations are up to date.

Officials at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta said travelers should make sure they are up-to-date on routine vaccines including: the measles-mumps-rubella vaccine, diphtheria-tetanus-pertussis vaccine, varicella (chickenpox) vaccine, the polio vaccine and a seasonal flu shot.

In addition, the CDC recommends getting the hepatitis A vaccine because people can get hepatitis A through contaminated food or water in Russia, regardless of where they are eating or staying.

Hepatitis A Risk Linked to Comstock Saloon

Patrons who visited the Comstock Saloon, a San Francisco restaurant and bar, during several days in December may have been exposed to the Hepatitis A virus, according to local news station KGO-TV.

An employee tested positive for the virus after working Dec. 12-15, 2013, and again on Dec. 19. That employee was not a food handler, according to the restaurant management.

While health officials say there is little risk of patrons contracting Hepatitis A, anyone who visited the restaurant on those days and has not been vaccinated has been advised to get tested.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A infection may include fatigue, diarrhea, muscle aches, vomiting, fever and jaundice. Those who have been vaccinated for Hepatitis A once in the past are safe from infection.

Contoocook, New Hampshire Hepatitis A Outbreak Mystery

Carrie Williams is healthy again, after suffering from hepatitis A and spending nine days in the hospital.

“I have never felt so ill in my life,” said Williams. “I’ve had double mastectomy surgery, I had my ovaries taken out. And I was more afraid of what was happening to my body with hepatitis A then I was then.”

Williams, 38, and her roommate worked at the Covered Bridge Restaurant in Contoocook, New Hampshire.

Both women somehow contracted hepatitis A, a virus that can attack the liver.

The diagnosis led health officials to hold a news conference alerting restaurant customers of a potential health risk, and the names of who was causing the crisis quickly spread in this small town.

“It scares people, the way it was presented is that if you talk to me you’re going to get hepatitis A,” said Williams.

State health officials set up special vaccination clinics, and urged patrons who had visited the restaurant in late July and early August to get vaccinated. More than 1,200 people did so.

Thunder Bay Wendy’s Linked to Hepatitis A Scare

CDC reports, that the Thunder Bay District Health Unit is putting the public on alert as it investigates a case of hepatitis A in an employee of Wendy’s restaurant located on Red River Road.

Anyone who consumed any food from this restaurant between Oct. 11 and 26 may have been exposed to the hepatitis A virus, the health unit stated.

While the risk of infection is very low, people who consumed food from the restaurant during this period should watch for signs of illness, the health unit said in a press release issued Friday.

People should contact their health care provider if they experience any of the following symptoms: fever, loss of appetite, abdominal (stomach) pain, tiredness, nausea, vomiting, dark urine, pale stools or yellowing of the skin or eyes (jaundice). Symptoms can develop anywhere from 15 to 50 days after exposure to the virus. Severity and length of symptoms can vary.

Hepatitis A Alert in North Dakota

The Fargo Catholic Diocese’s new bishop, John Folda, may have exposed hundreds of church members to the hepatitis A virus in late September and early October. The state Health Department has issued an advisory of exposure for anyone who was served communion at services attended by Bishop John Folda at four churches in Fargo and Jamestown during that time. The diocese said he contracted the infection through contaminated food while attending a conference for newly ordained bishops in Italy last month.

The North Dakota Department of Health issued an advisory of exposure on Thursday for anyone who attended church and had communion at the following churches:

• Holy Spirit Church, Fargo, on Sept. 27.

• Cathedral of St. Mary, Fargo, on Oct. 6.

• St. Paul’s Catholic Newman Center, Fargo, on Oct. 7.

• St. James Basilica, Jamestown, from Sept. 29 until Oct. 2.

The hepatitis A virus causes liver infection and is easily spread if people do not wash their hands thoroughly after using the restroom or changing a diaper or soiled sheets, then touch their mouths, prepare food or touch others with contaminated hands. Exposed individuals are encouraged to consult their health care provider only if they develop symptoms of hepatitis A. Symptoms include fever, tiredness, loss of appetite, nausea, abdominal discomfort, dark urine, pale stools and jaundice.

Durham Friends Meetinghouse Linked to Hepatitis A Risk

Food Safety News reports, Health officials in Maine have traced a case of Hepatitis A back to a community dinner in the town of Durham. Attendees who ate at the Durham Friends Meetinghouse over the weekend of Sept. 28 have been encouraged to receive a vaccine for Hepatitis A if they have not previously been vaccinated.

Approximately 100 people are believed to have attended the dinner.

Those who receive vaccines within two weeks of exposure to Hepatitis A have a good chance of staving off illness.

The Maine Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will hold a free vaccination clinic on Wednesday, Oct. 9, from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. at the Durham Eureka Community Center.

Symptoms of Hepatitis A illness include fatigue, nausea, vomiting and abdominal pain.

Hepatitis A Lawsuit to be Filed in New York

Over 2,500 Hepatitis A Vaccines given.

In response to cases of hepatitis A infections in an employee and four customers at New Hawaii Sea restaurant, located at 1475 Williamsbridge Road in the Bronx, the Health Department is urging customers who ate at the restaurant, either in-store, through catering or delivery, between September 7th and September 19th to receive hepatitis A vaccine as soon as possible. Any leftover food from this restaurant should also be discarded.

Any person who ate at New Hawaii Sea, either in-store, through catering or delivery, between September 7th and September 19th is considered at risk and is recommended to receive hepatitis A vaccine as soon as possible. Any person who ate food from this restaurant before September 7th should be evaluated if they have symptoms suggestive of infection. The Health Department is working with the restaurant to ensure that all the food handlers are vaccinated. The restaurant is cooperating fully with the Health Department and will remain closed until enough employees are vaccinated to reopen safely.

Download Complaint.

CDC Townsend Farms Hepatitis A Update

As of September 20, 2013, 162 people have been confirmed to have become ill from hepatitis A after eating ‘Townsend Farms Organic Antioxidant Blend’ in 10 states: Arizona (23), California (79), Colorado (28), Hawaii (8), New Hampshire (1), New Jersey (1), New Mexico (11), Nevada (6), Utah (3), and Wisconsin (2). [Note: The cases reported from Wisconsin resulted from exposure to the product in California, the cases reported from New Hampshire reported fruit exposure during travel to Nevada, and the case reported in New Jersey was a household contact of a confirmed case from Colorado.] Currently, 6 of the confirmed cases are household contacts of confirmed cases (secondary cases).

90 (56%) ill people are women

Ages range from 1 – 84 years;

94 (58%) of those ill were between 40 – 64 years of age.

11 children age 18 or under were also ill. None were previously vaccinated.

Illness onset dates range from 3/31/2013 – 7/26/2013

71 (44%) ill people have been hospitalized, and no deaths have been reported